Divorce: The Biggest (Financial) Decision You May Ever Make

Divorce is often a gut-wrenching process. It is also one of, if not the, most important decision you’ll ever make. The average divorce today takes about a year, sometimes longer, to resolve and it can also cost as much or more than what you spent on your wedding (in today’s dollars). Divorce also has the potential to be financially crippling, now and perhaps even more so in the future.

According to the Journal of Financial Planning, female caregivers are estimated to lose, on average, $324,000 in lost wages, social security benefits and pension. Unfortunately, after divorce, many women find themselves in a much lower financial position than their ex-spouses. Not only is this due to the caregiving roles many women have, it can also stem from a lack of clear understanding of the marriage’s total financial situation, such as the long-term investments the family holds, the family’s tax picture and actual family income. It would be difficult for any woman to make sound decisions, especially when faced with a divorce, if she is not aware of the complete financial picture.

Step 1: Understand Your Household Finances

One of the smartest things any woman can do is understand the family’s financial well being as soon as possible, no matter her situation. To get started, seek to understand what the assets are (stocks, property, retirement), what the actual family income is, and what are the family’s expenses. If thinking of a divorce, what maintenance (alimony) and/or child support would be needed to maintain your standard of living and cover your children’s needs?

Step 2:  Understand the Financial Implications

Even if divorce is just a whisper in your head, a clear way to help you make an educated financial decision is to engage the services of a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA). A CDFA will help you review the family finances and guide the conversation to help you understand the short-term and long-term financial implications of the decisions you will need to make.

Remember…divorce is a negotiation. Amazon didn’t buy Whole Foods without understanding their market share, profitability, and liabilities. Kodak and Xerox didn’t spin off parts of their businesses without taking into account how that was going to impact their future bottom lines. Divorce is essentially the same thing. What you need to ask yourself is what is the level of maintenance can you realistically accept/offer and what does that mean to your cash flow?  How do you split the family assets to be equitable and what are the long-term ramifications of those decisions?

Step 3: Seek a Professional Divorce Team

Attorneys have their place during your divorce as they counsel you through the legal aspects. However, most people don’t realize that the majority of attorneys and judges do not have a strong financial background (few law schools require any financial classes in their curriculum). This makes picking the right attorney for your particular situation critical. A strong attorney will incorporate the work of a financial professional into the process.

Getting divorced is hard enough, working with a team of divorce professionals can ultimately reduce the cost of the divorce and reduce the time it can take to make that divorce happen. Most importantly, before making any decisions in terms of divorce be as prepared as you can…financially, emotionally and legally. I often suggest that women check out a local divorce advice workshop like Second Saturday.

Even if you are not thinking about divorce, understanding and staying on top of your family’s finances can help you navigate whatever surprises come your way.

Kitty Bressington is a CERTIFIED FINANICIAL PLANNER™ and Certified Divorce Financial Analyst®. She is the owner of Linden Financial Consultants, a fiduciary financial advisory firm, and founding member of Foundation for Women’s Financial Education.


What’s in Your Resolution Wallet for 2017

With the New Year, almost without fail, most of us make our resolutions and one of them probably has something to do with money. A common resolution is to “save more for retirement” that often, as weeks or months go by, turns into “I’ll set aside a few dollars after I do this or pay that….” Let’s turn that on its head and suggest that you spend this year getting a handle on how you are spending money.

Even with the economy rebounding, more Americans are stressed out about money than ever before and many women carry the weight of that burden. This financial stress is actually hurting us, both emotionally and physically. Financial stress is directly linked to high blood pressure, ulcers, headaches and depression not to mention it’s the second leading cause of divorce in our country. How about we take a different tack to that New Year’s Resolution and spend the year figuring out why we’re stressed?

For many people, one of the roots of this stress is simply not knowing where their money is going. Understanding where we are spending our dollars is the first step to understanding why we are spending those dollars. Are you eating out too often simply because you aren’t sure what to cook, or perhaps, as a newly single woman, you aren’t thrilled about going home to an empty house so you delay the inevitable by eating out.

Just like a personal trainer can help you get in shape physically, a financial coach can help you get fit with your money. They can help you understand your financial issues and habits and guide change in your behavior with your money. There are many great financial coaches but be sure to look for one that has had rigorous and comprehensive training.

This year, make your New Year’s resolution to understand how you spend your money so all your future years can be less stressful and more savings focused.


Spring Cleaning of Your Financial House

Spring cleaning is the first thing that comes to my mind when I see the days getting longer and the flowers starting to sprout. Spring cleaning also applies to your financial house. Why not take an hour and review how you are doing compared to the budget you put in place last January? What? You didn’t write a formal plan for yourself for the New Year! It’s never too late to sit down and review where you stand financially. It’s not that difficult either, but it doesn’t hurt to have a coach on the sidelines helping you evaluate your next move.

For example, a good “best practice” is to (1) write down your goals and aspirations, (2) devise a plan to help you reach those goals, (3) periodically review where you stand relative to your plan and (4) engage the services of a professional to coach and counsel you on the right moves to make. As a career financial advisor, I work with very smart people every day who know what they need to do, but lack the resources to actualize their plan. That’s where I come in. As a fee-only financial advisor, my job is to provide as much or as little coaching as each client might desire. And, frankly, that’s all many clients need to feel confident and on-track with their plan. Questions? I am only a phone call away…